15 Stats On How The Top Nonprofits Use Social Media

Posted By on Oct 20, 2011 | 6 comments


I was reading an infographic from Craig Newmark’s CraigConnects and realized that the statistics within the image were brilliant. I wanted to outline some of the top stats and give you some ideas in regards to how the top nonprofits are using social meida.

“The deal is, it’s not about money, it’s about getting people to talk with each other to make people’s lives better,” said Newmark.

Visit Newmark’s Facebook page for the infographic, which includes an explanation of the methodology and sources used in its development.

1. 92 % of Nonprofit Websites Contain At Least One Social Media Button

This is important because 92% of them have a Facebook button. What is even more glaring is that only 12% of them have a LinkedIn

2. Only 12% of Nonprofits Use LinkedIN on their Website

This was a crazy concept to me. Out of all the socia media sites, LinkedIn has the higher income bracket and (probably) the higher level of engagement with business professionals. Why is it hard for nonprofits to understand the important of a networking website like LinkedIN?

3. YMCA has almost 500,000 less fans than the American Red Cross but $2 billion or more in budget.

4. PBS has the larget Twitter following at 840,653 (at the time of the creation of the infographic)

5. PBS is also the most talkative on Twitter at 877 tweets in a two month period of time.

6. 90% of Nonprofits have a Twitter share button on their website

Remember it is important to give users every opportunity to share your content.

7. Only 22% of Nonprofits have an RSS feed on their website.

This is interesting to me because it tells me that only 22% of nonprofits actively blog. This is a shame. Content is king and storytelling should be everything to the nonprofit entities on this list. Storytelling is what drives interaction and engagement among constituents.

8. C.A.R.E is the second most talkative Twitter account with over 860 tweets over a two month period of time.

This stat probably fluctuates based on what is happening within the nonprofit entity.

9. PBS is also the most commented nonprofit on Facebook averaging 17,205 comments over a two month period of time.

10. The size of the social media following of the nonprofit was not dependent on the budget size.

11. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society was last on the list on income but has over 97,000 fans on Facebook.

12. The 3rd most commented Facebook page is the Nature Conservancy with around 5,336 comments.

13. The organization with the highest net income, the YMCA, only posted 19 times to Facebook in two months, but has over 24,000 fans.

Is the YMCA missing something?

14. The American Red Cross was the first organization on the list to create a Twitter account.

15. Food for the Poor is the most talkative nonprofit on the list on Facebook, and has posted 220 posts over the course of two months.

It appears that income does not increase a nonprofit’s visibility and interactions in the social media world. Some of the most social media savvy organizations are in the bottom quarter income bracket, yet they are clearly active on social media.

 

6 Comments

  1. Great info! Thx. Excerpt: "Some of the most social media savvy organizations are in the bottom quarter income bracket" One wonders if being media savvy can lead to increased income. While donations are clearly not the only value of social media engagement, they constitute the easiest benefit to measure. Quantifying ROI for nonprofit SM is notorious bugaboo.

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  2. I couldn't agree with your comment to number seven more. "This is interesting to me because it tells me that only 22% of nonprofits actively blog. This is a shame. Content is king and storytelling should be everything to the nonprofit entities on this list." Storytelling is incredibly important to nonprofits. It's what gets sponsors and donors to really connect and relate to a cause. Plus, what better way to show your donors how they helped then to tell them the story of what their money or time went to? Smaller nonprofits probably don't have the resources, but bigger nonprofits should either start blogging or improve the sites they already have.

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  3. That was a very interesting and enlightening stats about how the top nonprofits use social media!! The 15 points discussed here really brings out some real facts which I am sure was never given a second thought before!! Like many have commented here, I was really taken aback to read that only about 22% of the nonprofits actively blog and how the number of fans that a nonprofit has, has nothing to do with how much of financial stability it has!! Very interesting indeed!!

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  4. Great stuff, but if you really want to see an org that has had achievements….real concrete achievements….look at the Nationwide MS Community. Interesting in public networking AND they brought up over $4 thousand dollars thru public networking programs.
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